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    Default This forum and Spearfishing

    ******When you register on the planet you will recieve an email with a link to click in order to verify your account. This email is sometime caught by spam and junk filters. If you are still having problems registering and viewing images please send an email to register @ spearfishingplanet . com*******


    You have found a great source for learning more about the sport and its history. There are a significant number of longtime underwater enthusiast who love to share their knowledge and experience with anyone willing to ask. There is often more than one correct answer to questions so be prepared to read many different POV.

    If you are completely new to the sport, you might mention that when you first start posting.

    I am going to try fill this section with the BASIC's so please enjoy!

    Last edited by Grauwer; 12-11-2007 at 07:58 AM.

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    Perhaps we could start something here like Hudgens once did with his thread on Tip on how to kill more fish!

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    How about starting this thread with how to get set up with the basic gear?

    Mask - the best way to buy a mask is to go to a dive shop and try one on. Fit is everything when choosing the best mask. Most spearos prefer black skirts. An opaque skirt will not allow light to enter the skirt and reflect off the lens causing glare. Good 'ol J-type snorkels work just fine.

    Fins - again, fit is very important and will have a huge effect on how comfortable you are in the water, as well as your ability to dive all day. Try them on with the neoprene socks or booties that you normally wear. If freediving, longblade fins like the Cressi 2000/3000 and Omer milleniums are a good start.

    Wetsuits - if it doesn't fit, it wont perform to it's full potential. There are some manufacturers that make custom suits for very competitive prices.

    Guns - Everyone wants to know which gun they should get to start out with. It is probably safe to say that a great many people started with a small AB Biller gun. I did, and they are great, reliable guns. However, the smaller guns (30-40 inches) are made for specific purposes - close shots, hole hunting, and low visibility. If you are diving in clear water, you should probably consider a gun in the 50" or greater range. There are many good gun manufacturers out there that all make quality equipment. Talk to your spearing friends and try to test a few out before you make a big purchase.

    Good luck!

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    I don't know if this is what you have in mind, but here is something I posted on another site yesterday in response to a question about the pros and cons of float lines vs. reels in California. It is specific to California freedive hunting. If you feel its not appropriate here, delete it or move it. I won't be insulted. I had already typed it once, so this is just a cut and paste.
    **************************************
    Sorry for the length, but I don't know where to start, and will be talking in circles some times. If you think this doesn't apply to you because you are a beginner, think about this. I have two beginner friends who have taken their first two white sea bass this year. The first fish for each was in the mid 30s. The second fish for one was 67 pounds, and the second fish for the other was 70 pounds. If they had not been properly quipped, they would have been SOL, lost the fish, and perhaps lost their gear.

    Float lines are thicker and easier to grab than reel lines. But you can mitigate that by using a reel large enough to hold enough thicker reel line.

    Reels are a lot less trouble getting into and out of the water from the boat or beach.

    With a float line rigged so that the line breaks away from the gun, you get to keep the gun in your hand, even if you lose the float line, float, tip, and shaft.

    If you are in open water, perhaps on a kelp paddy floating in the open ocean, you can have a big float with enough buoyancy to fight the fish and only need a float line a bit longer than the depth of your deepest dive. Fifty feet would be plenty for me, and would be a lot less trouble managing than a 100 foot line.

    But if you are diving in a kelp bed, you can't have a float on the rear of the line, or at least it can't be more than a small egg float that simply serves as something to grab when all the line has been pulled through your hand. If you used a larger float, when you dove and went under some kelp, you wouldn't be able to pull the float after you.

    So in a kelp bed you should have at least 100 feet of float line, even if the water is only 25 feet deep. The fish can run to the bottom, go around kelp in all different directions and run off horizontally, and you will be pulled straight down by a fish that is long gone through the bed. Many times you can put on early pressure and get the fish to tie up before you run out of line, but you shouldn't count on being able to do it with less than 100 feet.

    It seems counterintuitive, but one reason I prefer reels is that they can hold far more line than any float line I'd be willing to tow around. I think the least amount of line I have on a reel is 145 feet, and some other reels on my guns hold over 200 feet. I should be able to stop any fish I'll shoot in a kelp bed before it takes that much line.

    The fact that a breakway float line leaves you with the gun in your hand is mixed blessing, because now you have to do something with the gun. If you leave it floating on the surface while you dive to cut the fish out of the kelp, it may drift away. Or if the kelp bed is thick, you may have a very hard time finding it after you go following the line around and cutting the fish out. A common solution is to put your arm through the bands and sling the gun over your shoulder. That works fine in open water, but if I have to dive down to 50 feet or more in murky water in thick kelp to find my fish and cut it out, I don't want that gun with me, causing me to tangle even more in kelp and shooting line.

    If there is no buddy to hold the gun, what I usually did was to clip the gun to the rear end of the float line. The fish is tied up by then, so its not going to take your gun away.

    I used to use a reel in the kelp and a float line when diving offshore paddies. Dropping your gun or having a fish take it away from you in 2000 feet of water is not appealing. But the problem is that paddy diviing typically requires getting in and out of the water mutlple times as you try different paddies, and feediing that float line and float into the water, then pulling it back out, gets very old. Also, if more than one diver is in the water, float lines can swim sideways to find other float lines and mate with them, causing big tangle problems.

    So now I even use the reel on paddies. I doubt I'm going to shoot a fish that could spool me and take my gun, but if I do, I wear a knife on my forearm and hope that I could get to it in time to cut my reel line.

    Keep in mind that I have a bias for reels. Someone else can make just as strong a case for float lines, and I hope he will so that you get both sides.

    Meanwhile, I have an offer to make. If you would be willing to drive to San Clemente, I would be glad to show gear, rigging, exchange lies, show you how to tie your own bands, etc. I'm retired and can't go diving every day anyway.
    Last edited by Bill McIntyre; 07-21-2007 at 12:47 PM.

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    Excellent start guys, this what this new room if for. Let's try to welcome new spearos into the sport, for some reason they have not felt very welcome in the past. New shooters with a passion for the sport are as welcome here as any crusty ole veteran.
    Last edited by hogsniper; 07-21-2007 at 01:04 PM.

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    Default Basic equipment

    I didn't see it stated, but a sharp knife is a necessary safety tool. I believed in carrying a knife and after getting tangled in kelp and having to cut myself out of it I now won't dive with out one

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    Bill, I often switch between floatline and reel on my black gun here in NC, so I think that information is pretty universal for freedivers. One extra benefit to a breakaway/floatline setup is that you have a big stick in your hand to beat off the toothy dogs. I see no benefit to attaching your gun directly to the floatline.

    As for knives, these are essential equipment. I use two - one on my leg and one on my belt. Keep them sharp - if you ever have an entanglement issue, you will be glad you did.
    Last edited by kjflyfish; 07-21-2007 at 02:18 PM.

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    Another essential pointer especially for freeshafters and when you are trying to brain or string a fish - always shoulder your gun through the bands. You don't want to spend the rest of the day looking for your lost gun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kjflyfish View Post
    Another essential pointer especially for freeshafters and when you are trying to brain or string a fish - always shoulder your gun through the bands. You don't want to spend the rest of the day looking for your lost gun.
    Very good advice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kjflyfish View Post
    Bill, I often switch between floatline and reel on my black gun here in NC, so I think that information is pretty universal for freedivers. One extra benefit to a breakaway/floatline setup is that you have a big stick in your hand to beat off the toothy dogs. I see no benefit over a breakaway to attaching your gun directly to the floatline.
    I think the part about needing a line a lot longer in the kelp is specific to CA. In open water, say over a reef, you can get pretty much staight over the fish, so you don't need a line all that much longer than the depth, but in the kelp, the fish goes under kelp and then runs horizontally, and you can't get over it. With no float on the rear end, its just you vs. the fish.

    Why don't you have a big stick in your hand when using a reel?

    I think there are two benefits to breakaway vs attaching the gun to the floatline. If the fish takes everything else, at least it doesn't take your gun.

    And in the kelp, having the gun attached to the float lines means that you have two things to tangle up- the fish and the gun.

    Last summer I helped a guy cut his fish out of the kelp. After we got the fish up, then we had to go cut his gun out of the kelp.

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    Sorry Bill, I worded my last post a little funny. I agree with you on all counts. What I meant to say is that I prefer the breakaway. I think attaching your gun directly to the floatline is a bad idea, especially in sharky waters. I have edited the post to make more sense.

    A reel setup is definitely my favorite for water 70' or less. And yes, you also are able to protect yourself with a reel gun.

    I also think that having a longer floatline can be advantageous to a shorter one in certain situations. For example, during the Omer tournament, my buddy shot a nice almaco jack and kept it at about 45 feet for me. All the other almacos and amberjacks were staying with his fish. I dove on them and was closing the gap, but I had to swim horizontally a distance to keep up with them. Even though I had a 50' floatline at the time, I had "bottomed" it out and was pulling against my floatline and float trying to keep up with the fish. Needless to say, I ended up taking a really long shot and missed the fish. If I would have had a 75 to 100' floatline, I would have most likely shot the fish.
    Last edited by kjflyfish; 07-21-2007 at 02:19 PM.

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    Thumbs up Thanks from new spearo

    appreciate everyone taking the time out to post their experiences, likes and dislikes of reel vs. floatline. My only experience thus far is what I've read. My gun will be here this week and I'll be "poppin my cherry" next week, so I can't wait! Thanks for the info guys.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill McIntyre View Post
    I think there are two benefits to breakaway vs attaching the gun to the floatline.
    That's why I shoot breakaway in the kelp for sure, but for my euros, I just have a tuna clip on the handle that I attach to the front of the floatline and I think it is pretty damn easy, and as long as you rig your gear properly and make sure everything is in respectable working order, then you should be alright.

    Plus, I think it's bitchin in the videos on youtube when the guy shoots a Wahoo, the gun just gets ripped out of his hand and flys away w/ the fish, so cool.
    Nick Wagner - Santa Barbara, CA
    nwagner91@cox.net
    www.wagnerdiving.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by nwagner91 View Post
    That's why I shoot breakaway in the kelp for sure, but for my euros, I just have a tuna clip on the handle that I attach to the front of the floatline and I think it is pretty damn easy, and as long as you rig your gear properly and make sure everything is in respectable working order, then you should be alright.

    Plus, I think it's bitchin in the videos on youtube when the guy shoots a Wahoo, the gun just gets ripped out of his hand and flys away w/ the fish, so cool.
    Well, when I said this in a previous post

    Last summer I helped a guy cut his fish out of the kelp. After we got the fish up, then we had to go cut his gun out of the kelp.
    I was referring to Erik Sun, the Rabitech distributor, using one of his Euro guns.

    Admittedly, I don't have any personal experience with float line connected to the gun rather than rigged as breakaway, but if it matters, I don't see how there is any difference between Euro guns and treetrunks.

    In that one case, I was impressed with how much extra trouble it was to have to cut the gun out after cutting the fish out. Erik had had gotten tangled while trying to retrieve his fish himself and had been forced to drop his weight belt, so it was me and another guy retrieving his fish and gun. Or to be more precise, it was me holding two guns while the other guy retrieved the stuff. He had to make some dives to bring the fish up, but then the gun was all wrapped up too, so he had to make a couple more dives to cut it out.

    I have enough of a problem getting my fish out some times, so I don't need more trouble trying to get the gun. If a fish is tied up at 55 feet in the murk (that happens to be the depth of my favorite bed for big fish) it will be enough of a strain on me to get the fish out. I might not have enough left for the gun too. If that depth is easy for you, then just adjust my sentence for whatever depth is challenging for you to be working in low vis, with mono and kelp all around you, with negative buoyancy.

    I suppose I'm getting into the small stuff here, and its hardly a big deal if someone wants to have his gun dragged through the kelp, but I wanted to at least offer something to think about if someone hasn't been there.

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    An incredibly informative post and I appreciate it.Hope more add to it....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill McIntyre View Post
    Well, when I said this in a previous post



    I was referring to Erik Sun, the Rabitech distributor, using one of his Euro guns.

    Admittedly, I don't have any personal experience with float line connected to the gun rather than rigged as breakaway, but if it matters, I don't see how there is any difference between Euro guns and treetrunks.

    In that one case, I was impressed with how much extra trouble it was to have to cut the gun out after cutting the fish out. Erik had had gotten tangled while trying to retrieve his fish himself and had been forced to drop his weight belt, so it was me and another guy retrieving his fish and gun. Or to be more precise, it was me holding two guns while the other guy retrieved the stuff. He had to make some dives to bring the fish up, but then the gun was all wrapped up too, so he had to make a couple more dives to cut it out.

    I have enough of a problem getting my fish out some times, so I don't need more trouble trying to get the gun. If a fish is tied up at 55 feet in the murk (that happens to be the depth of my favorite bed for big fish) it will be enough of a strain on me to get the fish out. I might not have enough left for the gun too. If that depth is easy for you, then just adjust my sentence for whatever depth is challenging for you to be working in low vis, with mono and kelp all around you, with negative buoyancy.

    I suppose I'm getting into the small stuff here, and its hardly a big deal if someone wants to have his gun dragged through the kelp, but I wanted to at least offer something to think about if someone hasn't been there.
    I guess I forgot to mention that I'm using my Euros for fish that wont tie up like a WSB in kelp. I have a 130cm that I just got that I'm going to use in paddies for a couple of weeks, and I have a 110cm that I use to snipe calicos and is just my "all around" shore diving gun to use. The only WSB that I've landed have been w/ that 110cm on shore dives, but those fish didn't quite tie up in the kelp like I'm sure yours did
    Nick Wagner - Santa Barbara, CA
    nwagner91@cox.net
    www.wagnerdiving.com

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    Default Best advice

    This is the BEST advice I can give you..Dont dive with Gamble..He's a shark magnet JG....... I couldnt help it
    Fred H. Shomer RIP 11/19/07

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    Default how about some more on tactics locations fish

    I have been lucky to start diving with some guys that are very experienced, very strong divers/shooters...

    Since I am a novice, I am always asking questions about tactics and so forth, as my depth is not great (30-35 ft. max right now)

    can anybody enlighten me on good reef fishing tactics with specific fish, given my limited apnea abilities....(turns out I'm pretty good once I get close enough to pull the triggah...

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    Welcom one breath, Depending on you interest, freedive or scuba the answers can be different. I invite you to pose you question in either General or freediving sections for more direct answers.

    Chris
    Chris Grauer- "To protect, promote, and grow the sport of spearfishing" www.spearfishingplanet.com

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    could anyone explain or demo "braining" in detail..... thanks!

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